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Daisy flowers are an all-time spring favourite in South Africa and are perfect for easy colour on the patio and around the garden in sunny spots. In folklore daisies symbolize a new beginning and a new spring always brings a promise of renewal. Osteospermum known as the Cape Daisies are certainly one of the best sellers in SA and with good reason.

Indigenous and water wise the Cape Daisies herald the new season with masses of flowers in a range of colours from white, yellows through shades of pink to deep purple.

 

Indigenous and water wise
Indigenous and water wise
Pollinator friendly Osteospermum
Pollinator friendly Osteospermum

 

Perfect to fill a container with on the patio or for a patch of colour along a border, plant them close together for an instant show. They do best in full sun in a well-drained soil with not too much feeding and keep them slightly on the dry side for the best results. Depending on the heat they can last a few months giving unrivalled colour. Regularly dead head and remove the old flowers to get new flowers coming through.

Cape Daisies are not hungry plants. Feed them at planting with BioGanic organic fertiliser it’s all they need. If one overfeeds one will find that they get more and more leaves and fewer flowers.

The modern varieties of Cape Daisies are regarded as annuals and will last through to the start of the summer heat in November. They can be planted from late autumn or as the temperatures start to fall. In winter they don’t mind the cold but they won’t flower unless the days are warmer than the nights. Most varieties do not like direct frost which is why they have become more popular as spring flowers.

 

Cape daisies are not hungry plants
Cape daisies are
not hungry plants
Herb Mix for veggies and herbs in containers
Herb Mix for veggies
and herbs in containers
Colours to suit your style
Colours to suit your style
Osteospermum are indigenous
Osteospermum are indigenous

 

 

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